NYPD says it booted over 100 people from NYC subway in one day

Police recently booted more than 100 people from the subways in just one day — as concerns surge about the homeless camping out in near-empty subway cars during the coronavirus crisis, Commissioner Dermot Shea said Tuesday.

The top cop made the comments in a WCBS Newsradio 880 interview, without specifying which borough or on what day the ejections happened. It was also unclear whether all 100 ejected were homeless.

“We don’t eject people because they’re homeless – I’ll be very clear about that,” Shea said. “But many of the people we do eject are homeless. It’s for rules violations.”

Some “common sense things” can be done at the end of subway lines “so we don’t have an environment where people can ride the train endlessly, overnight, hours and hours on end,” the commissioner said.

“That’s not really what trains were meant for,” he added.

Recent photos and videos have shown homeless men and women stretched out and slumbering away, smoking and even defecating on trains.

“I’m troubled when I see these pictures,” Shea said. “Number 1 because you see the people that need help so much…. There’s also the scenario where we’re going to get back to work soon and we have to have workable trains, clean trains.”

Shea’s comments come as interim MTA president Sarah Feinberg declared in an opinion piece for the Post that “our customers shouldn’t have to board a car that has multiple people using it as a shelter and as a trash receptacle or toilet.”

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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NYPD says it booted over 100 people from NYC subway in one day

Police recently booted more than 100 people from the subways in just one day — as concerns surge about the homeless camping out in near-empty subway cars during the coronavirus crisis, Commissioner Dermot Shea said Tuesday.

The top cop made the comments in a WCBS Newsradio 880 interview, without specifying which borough or on what day the ejections happened. It was also unclear whether all 100 ejected were homeless.

“We don’t eject people because they’re homeless – I’ll be very clear about that,” Shea said. “But many of the people we do eject are homeless. It’s for rules violations.”

Some “common sense things” can be done at the end of subway lines “so we don’t have an environment where people can ride the train endlessly, overnight, hours and hours on end,” the commissioner said.

“That’s not really what trains were meant for,” he added.

Recent photos and videos have shown homeless men and women stretched out and slumbering away, smoking and even defecating on trains.

“I’m troubled when I see these pictures,” Shea said. “Number 1 because you see the people that need help so much…. There’s also the scenario where we’re going to get back to work soon and we have to have workable trains, clean trains.”

Shea’s comments come as interim MTA president Sarah Feinberg declared in an opinion piece for the Post that “our customers shouldn’t have to board a car that has multiple people using it as a shelter and as a trash receptacle or toilet.”

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Source

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